#Supernatural #Croatoan #The_End #Sam #Dean #Winchester (em Kansas City, Missouri)

  10:15 pm, by legendarium-enthusiast 1  |  Comments

Some Overlooked Facts in Middle-earth Canon

hail-brightest-of-stars:

  • Marriage ceremonies were considered a courtesy rather than a necessity in Elvish culture. Instead, the Elves saw sex as the final step towards marriage. Ceremonies for Elvish couples were often skipped in times of hardship and war (Morgoth’s Ring - “Laws and Customs Among the Eldar”).
  • The Elves saw both sexes as equal and did not always conform to gender roles. Any profession or task could be pursued by any Elf regardless of whether they were male or female (Morgoth’s Ring - “Laws and Customs Among the Eldar”).
  • Many women in the Haladin of the First Age were warriors. Haleth, chieftain of the Haladin, had a hand-picked all-female bodyguard to protect her during her rule in Beleriand (The Peoples of Middle-earth - “Of Dwarves and Men”).
  • A large amount of the humans in the Folk of Bëor had darker skin than the norm of those inhabiting the north of Middle-earth, some being swarthy (The Peoples of Middle-earth - “Of Dwarves and Men”).
  • Not all of the Easterlings agreed with their allegiance with Sauron. When the Blue Wizards arrived in the far east during the Second Age, they helped the Easterlings opposed to the rule of Sauron start uprisings which greatly reduced the power of Sauron’s human allies even into the Third Age (The Peoples of Middle-earth - “Last Writings”).


Reblogging because these facts are quite relevant and not many people have knowledge of them.

12:30 pm, reblogged  by legendarium-enthusiast 52  |
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margozofrhun:

// More of my editions, the houses of the Edain of the first age, plus the houses of the Easterlings of Beleriand.

You can follow my deviant gallery too: http://enanoakd.deviantart.com/

Ok, this is just awesome!!!

10:30 am, reblogged  by legendarium-enthusiast 117  |
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Official Tolkien Character Heights

hail-brightest-of-stars:

Elu Thingol - At least 8’ 0”

"His people gathered about him in joy, and they were amazed; for fair and noble as he had been, now he appeared as it were of a lord of the Maiar, his hair as grey silver, tallest of all the Children of Ilúvatar; and a high doom was before him."

- The Silmarillion, “Of Eldamar and the Princes of the Eldalië”

Elendil - 7’ 11”

"Elendil was said to be ‘more than man-high by nearly half a ranga’; but he was accounted tallest of all the Númenóreans who escaped the Downfall [and was indeed generally known as Elendil the Tall].”

- Unfinished Tales, “Disaster of the Gladden Fields”

(“Man-high” by Dúnedain standards is 6’ 4”, and a ranga is 38 inches.)

Isildur - Around 7’ 0”

"Aragorn, direct descendant of Elendil and his son Isildur, both of whom had been seven feet tall, must nonetheless have been a very tall man … , probably at least 6 ft. 6; and Boromir, of high Númenórean lineage, not much shorter (say 6 ft. 4)."

- Tolkien Papers, Bodleian Library, Oxford

Aragorn - 6’ 6”

"Aragorn, direct descendant of Elendil and his son Isildur, both of whom had been seven feet tall, must nonetheless have been a very tall man … , probably at least 6 ft. 6; and Boromir, of high Númenórean lineage, not much shorter (say 6 ft. 4)."

- Tolkien Papers, Bodleian Library, Oxford

Éomer - About 6’ 5” or 6’ 6”

"Éomer was said to have been tall, of like height with Aragorn; but he with other descendants of King Thengel were taller than the norm of Rohan, deriving this characteristic (together in some cases with darker hair) from Morwen, Thengel’s wife, a lady of Gondor of high Númenórean descent."

- Unfinished Tales, Disaster of the Gladden Fields

Boromir - 6’4”

"Aragorn, direct descendant of Elendil and his son Isildur, both of whom had been seven feet tall, must nonetheless have been a very tall man … , probably at least 6 ft. 6; and Boromir, of high Númenórean lineage, not much shorter (say 6 ft. 4)."

- Tolkien Papers, Bodleian Library, Oxford

Galadriel - 6’ 4”

"Galadriel, ‘tallest of all the women of the Eldar of whom tales tell’, was said to be man-high, but it is noted ‘according to the measures of the Dúnedain and the men of old’, indicating a height of about six feet four inches."

- Unfinished Tales, Disaster of the Gladden Fields

Celeborn - 6’ 4”

"Very tall they were, and the Lady no less tall than the Lord; and they were grave and beautiful,"

- The Fellowship of the Ring, “The Mirror of Galadriel”

Gandalf - Around 5’ 6”

"Gandalf even bent must have been at least 5’ 6" … Which would make him a short man even in modern England, especially with the reduction of a bent back."

- The History of The Hobbit, “The Bladorthin Typescript”

Bilbo Baggins - About 3’ 6”

"Actual size - only important if other objects are in the picture - say about three feet or three feet six inches."

- The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, “No. 27”


This is very important for reasons… aaaaand I’m taller than Gandalf, WHAAAT?!?? 

12:00 pm, reblogged  by legendarium-enthusiast 20  |
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yetibaba:

Bombadil Image courtesy of Jorge Luis Gariazzo - Flickr

OMG… it IS Tom. This is soooo creepy.

yetibaba:

Bombadil
Image courtesy of
Jorge Luis Gariazzo - Flickr

OMG… it IS Tom. This is soooo creepy.

11:30 am, reblogged  by legendarium-enthusiast 35  |
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Werewolves of Tol-in-Gaurhoth

image

Werewolves were servants of Morgoth, bred in the Elder Days from wolf and inhabited by dreadful spirits (fallen lesser Maiar or fëar of Orcs).


History


Werewolves were created (or a least corrupted from some other form) by Sauron, who was their master, and who took the shape of a great wolf himself at least once.

The first werewolf was Draugluin, and the greatest was Carcharoth, the guardian of Angband, a descendant of Draugluin as all other werewolves were.

In the Grey Annals it is told that “creatures that walked in wolf-shapes” entered Beleriand in the Valian Year 1330.

Tol-in-Gaurhoth or Isle of Werewolves, also called Wizard’s Isle was a fortress held by Sauron in the First Age, once called Tol Sirion.

Tol-in-Gaurhoth began as the Minas Tirith of Finrod Felagund, and was held by Orodreth for his uncle to guard the vale of Sirion. However, Orodreth was powerless to stop Sauron from taking the isle, and fled south. Sauron began breeding large wolves in the isle which he sent evil spirits in, turning them into werewolves.

Ten years later during the Quest for the SilmarilBeren Erchamion on his quest for the Silmaril enlisted Finrod’s aid, but they were captured passing the isle, and their companions slain one-by-one. Finrod saved Beren’s life, but died himself.

Lúthien and the Hound Huan came to Beren’s rescue, and while Huan killed the wolves Lúthien got control over the isle’s magic from Sauron. Sauron was defeated and fled, and Minas Tirith was reduced to ruins. Finrod was buried there. The isle remained clean afterwards, and no new tower was erected there.

Although not appearing as such in the known written records of Arda during the Second and Third Ages, Gandalf mentioned the werewolves as being among Sauron’s servants in the late Third Age, along with orcstrollswargs, and wraiths.


Names


In Sindarin, werewolves were called gaurhoth (sing. gaur). The Quenya name was nauro.

07:45 am, by legendarium-enthusiast 18  |  Comments